BILL LADING FORMS, Unfolding The Types & Areas Of Trade Use

BILL LADING FORMS, KNOWLEDGE BASE ON THE TYPES OF BILL OF LADING, AND NOTABLE AREAS OF TRADE DEPLOYMENT

Bill lading forms

The ‘bill lading forms’ is significantly a crucial document for seaborne trade, and it’s expected of trade enthusiasts to understand the nature of this document, either for logistics purposes, as an employee or a professional in the maritime industry which also includes those rendering their functions as clearing and forwarding (logistics entities). However, for research purposes, and passion for maritime trade, it will be fair to break things down.

And to notify you of our subject phrase ‘bill lading forms’ will be used occasionally in our analysis for search engine optimization purposes (SEO), instead of ‘bill of lading forms,’ which should’ve been the case.

Our analysis in this post will include details of all that was skipped in our previous posts about the bill of lading document, and the reason why our area of interest (bill lading forms) will include the master bill of lading (MBL), house bill of lading (HBL), and freights that fall in this category. Differentiating all that is obtainable with MBL and HBL, as we focus on their forms and freights associated with each of these documents.

A BILL OF LADING FOR FULL CONTAINER LOAD SHIPMENT (FCL)

Freights classified as full container loads are predominantly handled by shipping lines, and equally, issue its bill of lading documents on the basis of the contract of carriage irrespective of the volume. These goods could either be roll-on roll-out (RORO) freights, which means wheeled cargo, such as cars and other vehicles including other categories of goods shipped as full container load (FCL). With this, one should be able to differentiate freights under the categories of the roll-on roll-out, general cargo, other full container loads, with their respective bill of lading documents.

GENERAL CARGO OR BREAK BULK CARGO

Looking at this category of freight, it’s evident that the type of bill of lading document issued here would appear different, and so, it’s important to note, the document either comes as a master bill of lading or house bill of lading, with the latter coming from a shipping company. Therefore, one is able to differentiate freights that are directly shipped by a shipping line from that of a shipping company, even when freights are co-loaded with shipping companies. Also important to note is the description of the items or goods shipped with this document which should be specified in the description section of a bill of lading. Thus, helps to differentiate general cargo shipment from that of a less than container load (LCL).

LESS THAN CONTAINER LOAD (LCL)

This category of freight is very unique and as such, would require a special bill of lading known as the ‘house bill of lading’, specifically issued by freight forwarders or shipping companies, and not liners. As you know, freights shipped in this form as a single shipment, often consist of different house bill of lading, each from different shipping company either as co-loaded or purely on the basis of cargo consolidation, not necessary from a shipping company, but could be as a result of freight transshipment and other logistics purpose.

To differentiate this type of freight from others, its bill of lading document which is predominantly house bill of lading is often figured out from the goods description section, noting LCL specification coupled with the item’s cubic meter (CBM).

  • I hope this article helped you differentiate this document (bill lading forms)?